Wyatt Employment Law Report

Union Election Scoreboard: National Statistics

Leave a comment

By George J. Miller

To help our readers follow union election activity in our practice area, we will occasionally post election statistics and other information, such as locations of activity and the companies and unions involved.  For starters, here is the big picture, using nationwide statistics from election reports of the National Labor Relations Board, which are viewable on line at

http://www.nlrb.gov/publications/reports/election_reports.aspx.

Union Election Win Rates, 2000-2009

 

2009

66.8%

2008

62.4%

2007

58.6%

2006

57.5%

2005

58.9%

2004

55.5%

2003

56.4%

2002

55.6%

2001

53.1%

2000

51.2%

This data is for elections where the employees were not already represented by a union and were voting whether or not to be represented.  Win rates in cases involving incumbent unions are even higher. 

This data unquestionably shows that union win rates are going up and that for at least a decade unions have won a majority of these elections.  This undermines organized labor’s argument that Congress needs to pass the Employee Free Choice Act in order to level the playing field.  While the compromise bill reportedly being crafted by members of the Senate HELP Committee eliminates the card check provision of the original bill, this data indicates that even the provision for enhanced penalties against employers is unnecessary, because it shows that employers en masse are not illegally intimidating employees to vote against union representation.

Leave a reply. Please note that although this blog may be helpful in informing clients and others who have an interest in information privacy and security, it is not intended to be legal advice. The information on this blog also should not be relied upon to form an attorney-client relationship.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s