Wyatt Employment Law Report

NLRB Attacks Employee Handbook Rules

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By Edwin S. Hopson

In early June 2014, a National Labor Relations Board Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) in Professional Electrical Contractors of Connecticut, Case No. 34-CA-071532, ruled that a number of handbook provisions violated the National Labor Relations Act. The handbook applied to employees who largely worked in the field on customers’ premises.

The challenged handbook rules were:

  1. A rule prohibiting employees from disclosing the location and telephone number to outsiders of the customer to which the employee was assigned.
  2. A rule stating that no employee shall disclose customer information to outsiders, including other customers or third parties and members of one’s own family.
  3. A prohibition of boisterous or disruptive activity in the workplace.
  4. A rule against initiating or participating in distribution of chain letters, sending communications or posting information, on or off duty, or using personal computers in any manner that may adversely affect company business interests or reputation.
  5. A series of rules prohibiting employees from taking photographs or making recordings at the workplace without prior authorization by management.

The ALJ largely held for the NLRB’s General Counsel and issued an order requiring that the company cease and desist from:

(a) Maintaining a provision in its employee handbook that requires employees not to disclose the location of their customer assignment to outsiders.

(b) Maintaining a provision in its employee handbook that prohibits employees from engaging in “boisterous” activities in the workplace.

(c) Maintaining a provision in its employee handbook that prohibits employees from initiating or participating in the distribution of chain letters, sending communications or posting information, on or off duty, or using personal computers in any manner that may adversely affect company business interests or reputation.

(d) Maintaining a provision in its employee handbook that prohibits employees from taking photographs or making recordings at the workplace without the prior authorization by management.

The case likely will be appealed to the Board in Washington, D.C., and thereafter to a court of appeals.

This case is a good example of how closely the NLRB will scrutinize employee handbook provisions. This can be particularly problematic if the employer finds itself in the midst of a union organizing campaign.  Thus, if the employer wins the election, it may be set aside should there be handbook provisions in place that the NLRB finds objectionable.

For more information in the Louisville, KY, Lexington, KY or New Albany, IN areas, contact Ed Hopson.

For more information in the Memphis, TN, Nashville, TN or Jackson, MS areas, contact Odell Horton.

Leave a reply. Please note that although this blog may be helpful in informing clients and others who have an interest in information privacy and security, it is not intended to be legal advice. The information on this blog also should not be relied upon to form an attorney-client relationship.

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